Blog Archives

The American Educational Research Association Answers “Why Social Science?”

Twhy-social-sciencehis week’s Why Social Science? guest post comes from Juliane Baron of the American Educational Research Association, who writes about how education research has challenged our assumptions about how we learn and helped us improve the way we teach students. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 17 (September 5), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

The American Political Science Association Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThis week’s Why Social Science guest post comes from Steven Rathgeb Smith, Executive Director of the American Political Science Association, who writes about how political science helps us understand and engage with our political and social systems an
d institutions. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 15 (July 25), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

Why Social Science? Highlights the National Academies’ SBE Report

why-social-scienceThis week’s Why Social Science? post highlights the recent report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, The Value of Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences to National Priorities. Produced at the request of the National Science Foundation (NSF), the report assesses the contributions of the social, behavioral, and economic (SBE) sciences to issues of national importance.
Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 14 (July 11), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

The Crime and Justice Research Alliance Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThis week’s “Why Social Science?” guest post comes from Nancy La Vigne, Chair of the Crime and Justice Research Alliance and Director of the Justice Policy Center at the Urban Institute, who writes about how findings from criminology help us answer crucial questions about crime and our justice system. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 13 (June 27), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

The National Communication Association Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThis week’s Why Social Science? guest post comes from Paaige Turner, Executive Director of the National Communication Association, who writes about the role Communication research plays in helping shape our understanding of the world around us. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 12 (June 13), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

The American Academy of Arts & Sciences Answers “Why Social Science?”

This week’s Why Social Scienwhy-social-sciencece? guest post comes from John Tessitore, Senior Program Advisor at the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, who writes about how findings from the social sciences helped inform the Academy’s recent report, “America’s Languages: Investing in Language Education in the 21st Century.” Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 11 (May 30), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

Why Social Science? Highlights Paul Milgrom’s Auction Research

why-social-scienceThe most recent Why Social Science? post highlights a recent opinion piece published in The Hill by Paul Milgrom, a Stanford economist whose groundbreaking research in auction design is used by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to auction electromagnetic spectrum to companies, generating billions in revenue for the federal government. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 10 (May 16), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThe latest Why Social Science? guest post comes from Dr. Courtney Ferrell Aklin and Dr. Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), who write about how the social and behavioral sciences help us understand the social determinants of health and address health disparities. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 9 (May 2), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

Video from COSSA Briefing with Nobel Laureate Al Roth Now Available

On April 18, COSSA launched a new series of Congressional briefings as part of its Why Social Science? campaign. The event, Why Social Science? Because Understanding Markets Can Save Lives, featured a discussion with renown economist and Nobel Laureate Alvin Roth of Stanford University. The briefing series aims to highlight the many ways social and behavioral science research positively impacts our everyday lives.

Dr. Roth’s talk, Markets and Marketplaces: Making Markets Work, showcased the various ways markets—commodity markets, matching markets, and those that fall in between—impact our daily lives, from the New York Stock Exchange to dating apps like Tinder and eHarmony to ride-sharing apps to Internet search results. Knowledge about markets can also be applied to complex societal challenges, such as kidney transplantation. Dr. Roth outlined how he was able to apply his theories in matching markets to develop a system of kidney exchanges in which incompatible patient-donor pairs find compatible kidneys for transplantation. His innovations have translated into thousands of lives and millions of dollars in health care costs saved, and earned him the 2012 Nobel Prize in Economics.

Video from the briefing, as well as Dr. Roth’s slides, are available on the COSSA website. COSSA thanks Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson and her excellent staff for helping to facilitate the event, and SAGE Publishing for its generous financial support.

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Posted in Issue 9 (May 2), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

Why Social Science Is Marching for Science

why-social-science  MFS_logo

This week’s Why Social Science? takes a break from our regular guest posts to talk about the upcoming March for Science, and how and why social and behavioral scientists can get involved. Read it here and subscribe.

COSSA is an official partner of the March for Science. We are collecting information for social and behavioral scientists participating in the March for Science, both on the COSSA March for Science website and through a weekly newsletter that compiles the latest information and updates on March for Science activity (anyone can sign up to receive it here).

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Posted in Issue 8 (April 18), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

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