Blog Archives

Trump Releases FY 2019 Budget Request; Read COSSA’s Analysis of Social Science Impacts

On February 12, the Trump Administration began releasing details of its fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request to Congress, although details for some agencies (such as the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health) have yet to be released and are expected in the coming days or weeks. In light of a recent bipartisan agreement to increase discretionary spending over the next two years, the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) released an addendum to the FY 2019 budget outlining a number of adjustments to the budget request. However, the President’s views the new spending caps as a “ceiling” for FY 2019 funding, not as a funding target. As such, the request violates the budget deal by seeking to shift $57 billion away from nondefense discretionary spending and over to the defense side of the ledger.

The bottom line when considering the Trump Administration’s proposals for FY 2019 is that it remains a political, largely symbolic document that outlines the Administration’s priorities for the year ahead; take note of the policy priorities contained within the budget as they could shape some legislative and/or executive actions later in the year. However, Congress is not likely to go along with the bulk of the President’s recommendations, especially cuts for research and domestic programs writ large.

Read on for COSSA’s full analysis of the President’s proposals as they pertain to social and behavioral science research. Supplements to this report will be issued as additional agency details are released.

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Posted in Issue 4 (February 20), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

Don’t Forget to Register for COSSA Science Policy Conference & Advocacy Day

There is still time to register for COSSA’s 2018 Science Policy Conference and Social Science Advocacy Day on April 30-May 1 in Washington, DC! More information about the conference is available on COSSA’s website. Remember: All participants affiliated with COSSA member organizations and universities are eligible for a discount on Conference registration. Check your inbox for a previous email from COSSA with the discount code or email jmilton@cossa.org. And undergraduate and graduate students can register for only $50, an 80% savings off the base price. Interested students should send an email to jmilton@cossa.org with their program, university, and anticipated year of graduate to receive the discount.

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Posted in Issue 4 (February 20), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

COSSA Kicks Off the Second Year of “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceTo commemorate the beginning of a new year of Why Social Science?, Wendy Naus, COSSA Executive Director, shared some of the many ways the social and behavioral sciences inform the work of policymakers and other government officials. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 3 (February 6), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

Catch Up on COSSA’s Advocacy Twitter Chat with MPSA

On January 23, COSSA co-hosted a Twitter chat with the Midwest Political Science Association (MPSA), a COSSA governing member, that shared tips for social scientists who would like to become more involved in advocacy. You can read a recap of the conversation here.

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Posted in Issue 3 (February 6), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

Early Bird Registration Open for 2018 COSSA Science Policy Conference

Early bird registration is now open for COSSA’s 2018 Science Policy Conference & Social Science Advocacy Day, which will take place on April 30 – May 1 in Washington, DC. Registration rates will increase on January 16, so register now! Attendees affiliated with COSSA member organizations can receive an additional discount by using their exclusive member coupon code (email jmilton@cossa.org for details). In addition, students can register for a special price of $50. Interested students should email jmilton@cossa.org with your field of study, university, and anticipated year of graduation to receive the student discount code. More information about the conference, including sponsorship information and details on the conference hotel block, is available on the COSSA website.

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Posted in Issue 1 (January 9), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

COSSA Releases 2018 Rankings of College and University Social Science Investment

Last week, COSSA released its 2018 College and University Rankings for Federal Social and Behavioral R&D, which highlight the top university recipients of federal research dollars in the social and behavioral sciences. This year’s rankings feature a new dashboard with an interactive map of recipients of social and behavioral science R&D funding, which allows you to see how your university stacks up against more than 400 U.S. institutions. Based on the most recent available federally collected data, the COSSA rankings use an inclusive selection of fields to calculate the total federal R&D funding received by universities in the social and behavioral sciences.

The top 10 recipients for 2018 are:

  1. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill* (NC) – $104,085,000 (#1 in 2017)
  2. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor* (MI) – $98,348,000 (#2 in 2017)
  3. Pennsylvania State University, University Park and Hershey Medical Center* (PA) – $39,333,000 (#6 in 2017)
  4. University of Minnesota, Twin Cities* (MN) – $39,147,000 (#5 in 2017)
  5. University of Washington, Seattle* (WA) – $38,676,000 (#7 in 2017)
  6. University of Pennsylvania* (PA) – $35,449,000 (#4 in 2017)
  7. University of Maryland, College Park* (MD) – $35,235,000 (#3 in 2017)
  8. Arizona State University* (AZ) – $31,016,000 (#10 in 2017)
  9. University of South Florida, Tampa (FL) – $29,932,000 (#23 in 2017)
  10. University of Southern California (CA) – $29,810,000 (#11 in 2017)

* Denotes COSSA membership

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Posted in Issue 1 (January 9), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

COSSA Board Chair Felice J. Levine Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceOur last Why Social Science? guest post of 2017 was contributed by Felice J. Levine, Executive Director of the American Educational Research Association and Chair of COSSA’s Board of Directors, who reflected on the inaugural year of Why Social Science? Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 1 (January 9), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

Linguist Evan Bradley Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThis week’s guest post comes from linguist Evan Bradley, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Penn State Brandywine, who writes about how linguistics research can enhance our understanding of how society functions and ways to improve it. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 24 (December 12), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

Save the Date: 2018 COSSA Science Policy Conference and Social Science Advocacy Day – April 30 & May 1

COSSA’s 2018 Science Policy Conference and Social Science Advocacy Day will take place on April 30 and May 1, 2018 in Washington, DC. The Conference brings together COSSA members and other stakeholders for a day of discussion about federal policy impacting our science followed by the only annual, coordinated advocacy day in support of all of the social and behavioral sciences. Early bird registration will open later in December. More details will be posted on the Conference webpage as they are made available.

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Posted in Issue 23 (November 28), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

SRCD Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThis week’s Why Social Science? guest post comes from Martha Zaslow, Director for Policy and Communications at the Society for Research and Child Development, who writes about ways the social sciences can tell us how to “grow the roots” of STEM learning in children. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 23 (November 28), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

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