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The American Sociological Association Answers “Why Social Science?

why-social-scienceThis week’s Why Social Science? guest post comes from Jean Shin, Director of Minority and Student Affairs at the American Sociological Association, who writes about how insights from the social sciences both demonstrates the importance of diversity and help us identify ways build a more inclusive society. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 22 (November 14), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

COSSA Joins Societies in Requesting Changes to NIH Clinical Trial Policy

In a letter sent to National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Francis Collins on October 27, COSSA and 21 other scientific societies and associations requested that NIH revisit a new policy that alters the definition of “clinical trials” funded by the agency and institutes new reporting requirements for such research (see COSSA’s coverage of this issue). While the letter is supportive of the goal of enhancing transparency of NIH-funded research, including introducing registration and reporting requirements, the signatories express concern that “basic science research is being redefined as a clinical trial at NIH and that “basic science investigators will be unnecessarily burdened with requirements relating to conducting clinical trials that have nothing to do with their own research.” The organizations hope to work with NIH leadership to find a solution that addresses the concerns of the basic science community while still improving transparency for true clinical trial research.

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Posted in Issue 21 (October 31), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

COSSA, SAGE Host Why Social Science? Congressional Briefing

COSSA and SAGE Publishing hosted a Congressional briefing on Wednesday, October 4 on Social Science Solutions for Health, Public Safety, Computing, and Other National Priorities. The event featured authors of past Why Social Science? blog posts, including Representative Daniel Lipinski (D-IL), Peter Harsha of the Computing Research Association, Nancy La Vigne of The Urban Institute, and William Riley of the National Institutes of Health. Panelists discussed the importance of social science applications to preventing cyberattacks, how social science can help identify the causes of health disparities, and how behavioral reinforcement or “nudges” can be incorporated into federal policy. A complete recording of the event is available on COSSA’s website.

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Posted in Issue 19 (October 3), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

COSSA Praises Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking Report

On October 11, COSSA issued a statement on the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking’s final report, released in September (see COSSA’s summary of the report’s recommendations). The statement reads:

“COSSA applauds the work of the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking and commends its open, thorough process in producing its final report, The Promise of Evidence-Based Policymaking. The report represents the beginning of what we hope will be an ongoing, nonpartisan discussion on how the federal government can incentivize decision-making based on sound science while ensuring the careful stewardship of confidential information. The Commission’s recommendations demonstrate that expanding the use of evidence and data collection for policymaking purposes is not incompatible with enhancing privacy protections and transparency.

“COSSA thanks the Commissioners and their staff for their hard work, as well as Speaker Paul Ryan and Senator Patty Murray both for their foresight in authoring the Commission’s establishing legislation and their ongoing commitment to removing barriers to generating and using evidence to build strong public policy. While the recommendations in the report are an important start, many details on how to implement the vision set forth by the Commission remain to be determined. COSSA looks forward to working with its partners in Congress and at federal agencies on legislation and policy changes to ensure that the work of the Commission is brought to fruition.”

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Posted in Issue 19 (October 3), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

SAGE Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThis week’s Why Social Science guest post comes from Sara Miller McCune, Founder and Executive Chair of SAGE Publishing, who writes about how her personal and professional experiences have been shaped by research in the social sciences. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 19 (October 3), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

Tomorrow: Social Science Solutions for Health, Public Safety, Computing, and Other National Priorities

COSSA and SAGE Publishing will host a Congressional briefing on Wednesday, October 4 on Social Science Solutions for Health, Public Safety, Computing, and Other National Priorities. The event will feature authors of past Why Social Science? blog posts, including Representative Dan Lipinski (D-IL); Andrew Bernat, Computing Research Association; Nancy La Vigne, The Urban Institute; and William Riley, National Institutes of Health. The briefing will take place at noon in room 2075 of the Rayburn House Office Building. RSVPs are still being accepted here. For those unable to attend in person, the briefing will be livestreamed on COSSA’s Facebook page.

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Posted in Issue 19 (October 3), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

Research!America Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThis week’s Why Social Science? guest post comes from Mary Woolley, President and CEO of Research!America, who writes about how research in the social and behavioral sciences has led to life-saving interventions. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 19 (October 3), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

The Computing Research Association Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThis week’s Why Social Science? guest post comes from Andrew Bernat, Executive Director of the Computing Research Association, who writes about how insights from the social and behavioral sciences enhance the work of computer scientists. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 18 (September 19), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

The American Educational Research Association Answers “Why Social Science?”

Twhy-social-sciencehis week’s Why Social Science? guest post comes from Juliane Baron of the American Educational Research Association, who writes about how education research has challenged our assumptions about how we learn and helped us improve the way we teach students. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 17 (September 5), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

The American Political Science Association Answers “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThis week’s Why Social Science guest post comes from Steven Rathgeb Smith, Executive Director of the American Political Science Association, who writes about how political science helps us understand and engage with our political and social systems an
d institutions. Read it here and subscribe.

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Posted in Issue 15 (July 25), Update, Volume 36 (2017)

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