Read COSSA’s 2017 Annual Report

COSSA’s 2017 Annual Report is out now. Check it out to learn more about COSSA’s activities and successes over the past year. Find out how your organization can become a member of COSSA on our website.

Back to this issue’s table of contents.

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Issue 6 (March 20), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

Webinar Highlights Graduate Training in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

On March 6, COSSA hosted a webinar to discuss a recent workshop on Graduate Training in the Social and Behavioral Sciences convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM). The webinar featured Robert Kaplan (Workshop Planning Committee Chair) and Amy Stephens (NASEM), who discussed findings from the workshop (the workshop summary is available here) and potential next steps. Slides are posted on COSSA’s website. COSSA is collecting contact information for those who wish to stay involved in ongoing efforts in this area.

Back to this issue’s table of contents.

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Issue 6 (March 20), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

House Science Committee Holds Hearing on NSF Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Request

On March 15, the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held a hearing to discuss the National Science Foundation (NSF) budget request for fiscal year (FY) 2019. Witnesses included NSF Director France Córdova, National Science Board Chair Maria Zuber, and NSF Chief Operating Officer Joan Ferrini-Mundy.

Science Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) presided over the hearing and used his opening statement to express concern about several grants NSF has supported in the past that he does not consider to be addressing issues of national importance, a concern echoed by many other Republican members of the committee. Smith also expressed concern, shared by committee members on both sides of the aisle, that the U.S. is falling behind its international competitors in investment in research and development.

Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX), the top-ranking Democrat on the committee, used her opening statement to share her concern with NSF’s budget request being flat compared with the agency’s FY 2017 appropriation, and NSF’s proposed disproportionate cuts to education programs and the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE) Directorate. Other members of the committee, including Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR) and Paul Tonko (D-NY), expressed concern about the proposed cuts to the SBE Directorate. While not in attendance at the hearing, Dan Lipinski (D-IL) issued a statement for the record that expressed disappointment in the disproportionate cut to SBE.

Drs. Córdova and Zuber defended the agency’s support for the SBE sciences. Córdova shared that spectrum auctions, life-saving markets for kidney donations, and research in risk and resilience to natural disasters are all contributions of SBE-directorate supported research. Zuber added that the SBE directorate has supported research to understand what draws people to join violent extremist groups and that SBE-supported research in facial recognition aided in the capture of the Boston Marathon bombers.

Drs. Córdova, Zuber, and Ferrini-Mundy answered questions about NSF’s merit review process, U.S. international competitiveness in research, sexual harassment in science, STEM education, and other topics. Their full written testimony and a webcast of the hearing is available here.

Read COSSA’s full analysis of NSF’s FY19 budget request here.

Back to this issue’s table of contents.

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Issue 6 (March 20), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

FY 2018 Nearing Completion; House Members Join Together to Support NSF in FY 2019

More than five months into fiscal year (FY) 2018, Congress is finally close to a resolution on the annual appropriations bills. The government is currently operating under a stop-gap spending resolution that will end on March 23 and Congressional leaders are confident that funding for the remainder of the fiscal year will finalized before that deadline. Much of the remaining negotiations are still uncertain and exact timing is unclear. Read COSSA’s complete coverage of FY 2018 appropriations here.

Looking ahead to next fiscal year, 161 members of the House of Representatives joined Representatives G.K. Butterfield (D-NC) and David McKinley (R-WV) in a letter to the House Commerce, Justice, Science Appropriations Subcommittee to support a budget of $8.45 billion for the National Science Foundation (NSF) in FY 2019. The letter highlights scientific and technological breakthroughs that have been made possible through NSF funding.

Back to this issue’s table of contents.

Posted in Issue 6 (March 20), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

OSTP Publishes Report on “Science & Technology Highlights” in the Trump Administration

Earlier this month, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) published a 12-page report detailing the “tremendous” science and technology achievements made during the first year of the Trump Administration. According to the report, OSTP “has built a robust team of over 50 staff members,” although the size of the office is less than 40 percent of what it was under the previous Administration, and the President has yet to nominate an OSTP Director or a science advisor. The report describes accomplishments, such as the awarding of Nobel prizes to National Science Foundation-funded scientists whose research was supported during previous administrations, in the categories of Artificial Intelligence & Autonomy, Biomedical Innovation, Connectivity, Cybersecurity & Government IT Services, Digital Economy, Energy Dominance, Homeland Defense & National Security, Opioid Epidemic Response, Scientific Discovery, Space Exploration, and STEM Education.

Back to this issue’s table of contents.

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Issue 6 (March 20), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

COSSA Washington Update, Volume 37 Issue 5

Featured News

COSSA in Action

Federal Agency & Administration News

Community News & Reports

COSSA Member Spotlight

Events Calendar

Posted in Issue 5 (March 6), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

NSF Releases Additional Details of FY 2019 Budget Request

On February 28, full details of the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request for the National Science Foundation (NSF) were released. Preliminary details were unveiled on February 12 with the rest of the President’s FY 2019 budget.

The President’s request includes a total of $7.5 billion for NSF in FY 2019, which is flat with the FY 2017 enacted level (Note: FY 2018 appropriations have not yet been completed, so comparisons are made to the last enacted level). As previously reported, prior to enactment last month of a bipartisan budget deal to raise discretionary spending caps, the Administration’s budget proposal for NSF was $5.3 billion, a nearly 30 percent cut to the agency. Unfortunately, the newly released details show that the additional funding associated with raising the caps would not be spread evenly across the foundation. Instead, the request seeks to reprioritize funds toward NSF’s Big Ideas initiatives at the expense of several existing programs and activities. Of particular concern is the disproportionate treatment of the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate (SBE) in the request, which would see a cut of 9.1 percent from FY 2017 (11.2 percent to its research and education activities). This is compared to the other directorates that would be held flat or cut by one or two percent.

Read on for COSSA’s full analysis of the NSF FY 2019 Budget Request.

Back to this issue’s table of contents.

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Issue 5 (March 6), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

The Council on Social Work Education and The Society for Social Work and Research Answer “Why Social Science?”

why-social-scienceThis month’s Why Social Science? guest post comes from Darla Spence Coffey, President & CEO of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), and James Herbert Williams, Past President of the Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR), who kick of Social Work Month by writing about the contributions social work research has made to enhancing human well-being. Read it here and subscribe.

Back to this issue’s table of contents.

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Issue 5 (March 6), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

Sian Beilock, President of Barnard, to Keynote COSSA Conference; Other Speakers Announced

COSSA has announced that Sian Beilock will deliver the keynote address for the COSSA 2018 Science Policy Conference on April 30. Beilock is the 8th president of Barnard College and a psychologist who studies how children and adults learn and perform at their best, especially under stress. She is the author of Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal about Getting It Right When You Have To (2010) and How the Body Knows Its Mind: The Surprising Power of the Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel (2015).

COSSA has also released information about some of the plenary sessions that will be held during the Conference. A panel entitled “Post Truth: Communicating Facts, Not Fiction” will feature Cary Funk, Director of Science and Society Research at the Pew Research Center, and Melanie Green, Associate Professor Communication at the University at Buffalo. Another panel, on “Reestablishing Trust in Social Science & Data” will feature Arthur “Skip” Lupia, Hal R. Varian Collegiate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, and Brian Nosek, Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia and Executive Director of the Center for Open Science.

With the Conference is less than two months away, register today to ensure your spot! Remember: All participants affiliated with COSSA member organizations and universities are eligible for a discount on Conference registration, and undergraduate and graduate students can register for only $50. Email jmilton@cossa.org for more information.

Back to this issue’s table of contents.

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Issue 5 (March 6), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

National Institute of Justice Seeking Peer Reviewers

The National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research and evaluation agency of the Department of Justice, is seeking to expand its pool of peer reviewers. NIJ’s grant making process relies on scientists and criminal justice practitioners to provide expertise and feedback on the scientific rigor and merit of applications. NIJ is specifically seeking research and technical experts in the following areas: human trafficking, firearms violence, mass shootings, school safety, terrorism, gangs, persistently violent communities, and hate crime. More information about becoming a peer reviewer can be found on the NIJ website.

Back to this issue’s table of contents.

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Issue 5 (March 6), Update, Volume 37 (2018)

Subscribe

Click here to subscribe to the COSSA Washington Update, our biweekly newsletter.

Archive

Looking for something from a previous issue of the COSSA Washington Update? Try our archive.

Issues

Browse by Month